Hunting around the world

Africa: The Dream of African Hunting

For many keen hunters, Africa represents the fulfilment of their dreams. As always, though, there is a difference between the dream in the arm chair in front of the fire, while you plan your safari, and the reality on the ground amidst the heat, dust, tsetse flies and the inevitable, unique African ability to break, disrupt or derail the best of plans.

Norma’s commitment to the hunter is to deliver the finest ammunition possible, so that, whatever else Africa throws in the sportsman’s face, poor performance from his ammunition will not be a factor. For, whether you are hunting the big five or collecting the tiny ten, highest quality ammunition is a key component. Norma took a simple, no-compromise approach to making the most reliable and best-performing ammunition available for African hunting. Whatever Africa throws at you, we will deliver our part of fulfilling your dream safari.  

 

North Europe: Good penetration and consistent performance in extremes of temperature.

For a North European hunter it is not unusual to be afield when temperatures are -20°C or even lower during a considerable part of the season. But in early autumn, hunting roe deer, wild reindeer and red deer, it is not uncommon to have +30°C or more. This requires a lot from the rifle, but most of all from the ammunition. It must work impeccably and be stable with maximum precision under all the extreme conditions that a northern hunter may encounter. Norma has the knowledge to produce that ammunition, trusted by generations through hunts for roe buck, wild boar, moose, deer and bear, as well as the winter hunt of capercaillie, when accuracy is crucial and conditions can be extreme.

SWEDEN - Hunting in northern Europe

"The snow is crunching under our boots, and apart from a faint, blood-red streak in the east, it is still completely dark, although it is almost eight o’clock in the morning. The wind is light, but bites the skin intensely and unless the gloves come on quickly, the fingers turn stiff­ in a matter of minutes. The companions are speaking quietly and their breath hovers like a cloud over their heads, as they stomp their feet to get warmer while waiting to be posted. The mercury has climbed to -22° C. The hunting leader looks at his watch and towards the horizon – “Gentlemen, it’ll be a bit chilly, but a nice hunting day when the sun rises. Happy hunting!”

Christer Holmgren

 

Central- and Southern Europe: Continental hunting –a great variety of hunting challenges

 

Every kind of game requires different performance from a bullet. For all the game in central- and southern Europe, Norma offers a bullet that is tailored to the specific needs of the hunt. Cartridges loaded with rapidly mushrooming Norma Plastic Point and Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets ensure an instant knock-down effect. The Norma Vulkan and Soft Point deliver quick, safe and reliable expansion. The Nosler AccuBond gives safe mushrooming and deep penetration.

 AUSTRIA – Hunting Chamois in the Alps

The dream of many hunters is once in a lifetime to hunt down a chamois in the rocky ridges of the Alps. Particularly in Austria chamois hunting is a tradition, and it would be hard to find a hunter who wouldn’t be looking forward to going after chamois up in the mountains.


Photo: HF Zedka

The annual highlight for hunters is the chamois rut in November, mostly at a time when the snow is lying high in the mountains. Hunters then can observe the wild chase of the chamois bucks and experience the inevitable surprise of one sort or another, such as an encounter with a completely unknown, strong, old buck … Then the excitement of the pursuit becomes almost tangible and tension peaks. Later on, it’s time to hold your trophy in your hands and count the annual rings, a moment full of emotion and a personal gain in every hunter’s life.

Hans-Friedemann Zedka


Photo: HF Zedka


FRANCE – Boar Hunting in Corsica

It’s nine o’clock on this morning of October 21st. We’ve been positioned for two hours, and my placement on the rock allows me an overview of the thicket overhanging the valley of Ortolo.


Photo: F.-X. Allonneau / Connaissance de la Chasse

It’s already warm. All of a sudden, there’s the sound of running to the right, and the dogs immediately start pursuing the roused boar, which is running straight towards me! All senses at full alert, I look back and forth to the right and to the left at the two coulées I’d taken time to locate on my arrival. The barking approaches; the beating of my heart accelerates. I think I hear a noise to my right, I get ready, and the boar springs out from the left, crossing the narrow track like a rocket, before I can even raise my riŠfle … To my great joy, half an hour later, my patience is rewarded and I finally succeed in adding a fine Corsican boar of 40 kg, already with great tusks, to the bag of the day.

Thierry Daguenet


Photo: F.-X. Allonneau / Connaissance de la Chasse


SPAIN – Mouflon Hunting in Monterria

Here in the stand I have been allocated, I can’t believe my luck. The dogs can be heard, now nearer, now farther, restlessly seeking out a trail.


Photo: Pablo Gonzales

And slowly, the prey comes into sight. In the distance, I see animals moving towards other stands. I need to keep quiet and on high alert for them to approach my stand with their nervous gait. My visibility is good but any movement could easily give me away. There is a lot of commotion, and an animal may approach at any moment. And now, behind two females, a male mouŠfflon is heading towards me. Look at them run! The shot requires enough calmness to lead the target by just the right amount, the con dence that comes from having done it many times and from the fact that with my Blaser R93, my ZEISS 2,5-10x50 and my 30-06 Norma Plastic Point I couldn’t possibly be better equipped. Despite the animal’s running, my shot goes o­ smoothly and finds its target. Here I am, in the midst of a festival of light, colours, smells and sounds. Yes, I can’t believe my luck.

Pablo Gonzales


Photo: Pablo Gonzales


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North America: Hunting in vast territories – be prepared for longer ranges!

North America offers vast and varied hunting for everything from the smallest varmints to huge moose, elk and bear. That is why Norma manufactures ammunition with different performance including deep penetration and high residual weight for the toughest game, superior accuracy and rapid expansion for smaller game at long distances.

"Hunting Notes on North America

It’s arguably the greatest game field on earth, with extremes to test any rifleman.

The wind comes overnight, caressing the deep waters of Hudson’s Bay. It nudges drift ice north, toward the shore where the hunters sleep. Their tent flaps shudder only slightly. But at dawn these Inuit awake to a mountain range where there had been sea. Ice-blocks the size of cottages are stacked tight as far as eyes can see. Their peaks tilt crazily against a blue arctic sky. There will be no canoe travel until a north wind opens the bay. Today the hunters will stalk caribou.

In the Sonoran Desert, cholla cactus seems able to jump. You think you’ll clear the slender spines – but suddenly you’re festooned. Meanwhile, prickly pear hides in dry grass, ready in ambush should you flop prone for a long shot at a Coues buck. Like the spare vegetation, this diminutive whitetail is the colour of the desert itself. You think it is grey, that the ocotillo is green. They are both in fact desert. Your eyes tire sifting detail. But that is what you must do, if you are to kill a buck.


Photo: Wayne van Zwoll

September shoots gold into aspens and blankets high meadows with frost. Here, three kilometres high, horses nicker in the dark. Lanterns sputter to life. White tents glow, winks of light beating dawn to the Rockies. This spine of North America touches Mexico and the Yukon. Its middle section defines elk country. Haunting whistles of rutting bulls rise from lodgepole jungles and echo from alpine slips as the hunters break bucket ice, tug cinches and slide rifles into scabbards. It is the apron of the Rockies, a shimmering reach of sage and grass. Frigid winters and blazing summers sift the wild creatures here, leaving only the hardiest. These once included bison, shot from the millions to near-extinction by market hunters. Sport hunters saved a remnant, and restored the pronghorn, a striking antelope that is not an antelope. Shooting here is often long; getting close is hard. As shadows lance from beneath a red sun, a hunter finds a chalk rump and black horns in his rifle-scope. Steady, now …


Photo: Wayne van Zwoll

Explorer Meriwether Lewis forbade any of his party to fire on one of the surly silver bears unless accompanied by another rifleman. Settlement pushed the grizzly from the plains, but hunters still found it in the Canadian North, where vast woodlands hold moose and alpine meadows wild sheep: the bighorn, the Dall’s, the Stone’s. Cliff-dwelling goats appear as white dots suspended in mist. Hunters once packed in for 30 days, so long are the trails, so unpredictable the weather. Aeroplanes on boats now truncate travel. But the loneliness remains where big creatures range far, and there’s virgin earth to tread.

Two hundred and fifty years ago hardwoods in the Appalachians fell to settlers carving homesteads from wilderness. The Ohio bared its dark earth beneath the saw. Michigan’s pine forests toppled, then the great conifers of the Pacific Northwest. In the saw’s wake came more people – but also brush fields and second-growth timber that fuelled a deer boom. Whitetails in the East and mule deer and Hunting Notes on North America blacktails in the West prospered when climax forests gave way to younger, more accessible vegetation. Now, in the grey light of October dawn, hunters lean against trees, carbines ready, watching trails well-travelled. 

There is no way to describe a continent, or the terrain or the wildlife defining its far reaches. The North American game field includes swamp and mountain, forest and desert, at elevations from sea level to nearly 4,000 metres. Huntingseason temperatures range from -30 to +40°C. There are 27 recognized species of big game here, and conditions as challenging as anywhere in the world. Millions of hectares of public land afford access to any licensed hunter without additional fee. Europeans find different traditions in North America, where hunting for sport and subsistence has an egalitarian flavour. People from all social classes can and do hunt. Most limited permits are affordable and allocated by draw – albeit private-land access does favour the wealthy.

Firearms ownership and use are restricted only in some cities. Oddly enough, suppressors (silencers) require special licensing. And night hunting for big game is forbidden. States set seasons and define legal hunting arms (including handguns). In some heavily populated areas, shotguns with slugs must be used instead of rifles. Most states carve out special seasons for hunters using archery equipment and muzzle-loading rifles.

North American hunters typically prefer bolt-action rifles chambered for flat-shooting cartridges like the .270, .30-06 and various .30-magnums. High-powered variable scopes predominate. Though many animals are killed up close, accuracy at long range is considered a virtue, largely because of terrain and hunting practices here. It’s harder to find the organized drive preferred in European forests. Hunters do gather for informal deer drives in the eastern US; however, most riflemen stalk or wait for game alone or with a partner.


Photo: Wayne van Zwoll

The best way to taste North American hunting? Lace up those boots and follow a trail into what many sportsmen call the greatest game field on earth."

Wayne van Zwoll

 

Russia: The home of great adventures, hunt the trophy of your dreams!

Vast wilderness, forests that stretch for thousands of miles, imposing mountain ranges and volcanoes – Russia is the home of great hunting adventures, with a wide diversity of wildlife and exceptional trophies.

Norma offers the perfect ammunition for every challenge to be found in Russia – in magnum as well as in standard calibres.

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